romkids:

Eye of Horus pumpkin!

Check out this awesome Eye of Horus pumpkin from our first annual Pumpkin Carving Jam. The Eye of Horus was an ancient Egyptian symbol for protection. It was found often on various funerary arrangements for use in the afterlife. It’s also looks AWESOME on a pumpkin.

Written by @kironcmukherjee. Last update: October 27th, 2013.



romkids:

Chris Hadfield Came to the Museum (sort of)!
This week at Saturday Morning Club, we celebrated Halloween early by dressing up! Many staff and campers came dressed up as their favourite cartoon characters, super heroes and animals (one camper came as a zebra). 
My hands down FAVOURITE costume was 9 year old Simon dressed up as Chris Hadfield. Simon’s costume came complete with mustache, astronaut suit AND CARDBOARD ACOUSTIC GUITAR. Fittingly, Simon is also in our astronomy group, Starquest! 
Simon and I both agreed that maybe we should photograph this moment and send it to our mutual hero Chris. We went up stairs to our Rocks and Minerals Gallery, and took a few photos in front of our collection of meteorites, as well as Moon and Mars rocks to keep with the space theme.
Shout out to my li’l dude Simon for such an inspired choice in costume and a big thank you to Chris for being a true Canadian hero.
Check out our past blogs on Chris Hadfield!
A few final thoughts on Chris Hadfield’s gift to education, communication & access
Reasons for Chris Hadfield
Written by @kironcmukherjee. Last update: October 27th, 2013.

romkids:

Chris Hadfield Came to the Museum (sort of)!

This week at Saturday Morning Club, we celebrated Halloween early by dressing up! Many staff and campers came dressed up as their favourite cartoon characters, super heroes and animals (one camper came as a zebra). 

My hands down FAVOURITE costume was 9 year old Simon dressed up as Chris Hadfield. Simon’s costume came complete with mustache, astronaut suit AND CARDBOARD ACOUSTIC GUITAR. Fittingly, Simon is also in our astronomy group, Starquest

Simon and I both agreed that maybe we should photograph this moment and send it to our mutual hero Chris. We went up stairs to our Rocks and Minerals Gallery, and took a few photos in front of our collection of meteorites, as well as Moon and Mars rocks to keep with the space theme.

Shout out to my li’l dude Simon for such an inspired choice in costume and a big thank you to Chris for being a true Canadian hero.

Check out our past blogs on Chris Hadfield!

Written by @kironcmukherjee. Last update: October 27th, 2013.


njwight:

faunachimps:

The remarkable Chance.

I have missed my chimpanzee friends at Fauna while away. Looking forward to seeing them and photographing them all again next week.

njwight:

faunachimps:

The remarkable Chance.

I have missed my chimpanzee friends at Fauna while away. Looking forward to seeing them and photographing them all again next week.


paleopedia:

The King Lizard, Basilosaurus (1834)
Phylum : ChordataClass : MammaliaOrder : CetaceaeSuborder : ArchaeocetiFamily : BasilosauridaeSubfamily : BasilosaurinaeGenus : BasilosaurusSpecies : B. cetoides, B. isis
Late Eocene (41 - 35 Ma)
20 m long and 50 000 kg (size)
Oceans worldwide (map)

One of the odd things about paleontology is that incorrect names can sometimes take precedence over correct ones. For example, when its bones were first discovered in 1843, the prehistoric whale Basilosaurus was incorrectly identified as a marine reptile—hence its name, Greek for “king lizard.” Scientists then tried to amend their mistake by calling it Zeuglodon (after a feature of this enormous mammal’s teeth), but usage has since reverted to the earlier, incorrect moniker.
Whatever you choose to call it, the 50-ton Basilosaurus was one of the largest animals of the Eocene epoch, rivaling earlier, landbound sauropod dinosaurs like Seismosaurus and Argentinosaurus in size. Because it had such small flippers, relative to its bulk, it’s believed that Basilosaurus swam by undulating its long, snake-like body; today, it’s the official state fossil of both Mississippi and Alabama, where various specimens have been discovered…
(read more)

paleopedia:

The King Lizard, Basilosaurus (1834)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Mammalia
Order : Cetaceae
Suborder : Archaeoceti
Family : Basilosauridae
Subfamily : Basilosaurinae
Genus : Basilosaurus
Species : B. cetoides, B. isis

  • Late Eocene (41 - 35 Ma)
  • 20 m long and 50 000 kg (size)
  • Oceans worldwide (map)

One of the odd things about paleontology is that incorrect names can sometimes take precedence over correct ones. For example, when its bones were first discovered in 1843, the prehistoric whale Basilosaurus was incorrectly identified as a marine reptile—hence its name, Greek for “king lizard.” Scientists then tried to amend their mistake by calling it Zeuglodon (after a feature of this enormous mammal’s teeth), but usage has since reverted to the earlier, incorrect moniker.

Whatever you choose to call it, the 50-ton Basilosaurus was one of the largest animals of the Eocene epoch, rivaling earlier, landbound sauropod dinosaurs like Seismosaurus and Argentinosaurus in size. Because it had such small flippers, relative to its bulk, it’s believed that Basilosaurus swam by undulating its long, snake-like body; today, it’s the official state fossil of both Mississippi and Alabama, where various specimens have been discovered…

(read more)

(via rhamphotheca)


unknown-endangered:

Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki)
Endangered on the IUCN Red List.
Zalophus wollebaeki is found only around the Galapagos Archipelago. It doesn’t go far out to sea, and instead remains within around 16 kilometres of the coast. It hunts in shallow waters for octopus, fish, and crustaceans. Females gather on the shore in colonies of around 30 individuals, along with a few males who compete for access to the females. Gestation lasts 11 months, although the implantation of the fertilised egg is probably delayed for the female to wean her current pup.
Although populations have recovered from hunting during the 19th century, Z. wollebaeki is now under threat from conflicts with humans. They are sometimes caught in fishing nets, especially juveniles, because of their curious nature. The El Niño event of 1997-98 severely affected this species, and many migrated away. A virus called seal lion pox is also responsible for a number of deaths.
Threats affecting Z. wollebaeki are monitored by The Charles Darwin Research Centre, and the Galapagos Marine Reserve has helped to protect this species since 1998.
Photo: David Paul on flickr.

unknown-endangered:

Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki)

Endangered on the IUCN Red List.

Zalophus wollebaeki is found only around the Galapagos Archipelago. It doesn’t go far out to sea, and instead remains within around 16 kilometres of the coast. It hunts in shallow waters for octopus, fish, and crustaceans. Females gather on the shore in colonies of around 30 individuals, along with a few males who compete for access to the females. Gestation lasts 11 months, although the implantation of the fertilised egg is probably delayed for the female to wean her current pup.

Although populations have recovered from hunting during the 19th century, Z. wollebaeki is now under threat from conflicts with humans. They are sometimes caught in fishing nets, especially juveniles, because of their curious nature. The El Niño event of 1997-98 severely affected this species, and many migrated away. A virus called seal lion pox is also responsible for a number of deaths.

Threats affecting Z. wollebaeki are monitored by The Charles Darwin Research Centre, and the Galapagos Marine Reserve has helped to protect this species since 1998.

Photo: David Paul on flickr.

(via rhamphotheca)


zacharge:

Western Skink (Plestiodon skiltonianus skiltonianus) - Contra Costa County, CA, USA
An adult Western Skink quickly bolts down a burrow after I flipped the rock it was hiding under.

zacharge:

Western Skink (Plestiodon skiltonianus skiltonianus) - Contra Costa County, CA, USA

An adult Western Skink quickly bolts down a burrow after I flipped the rock it was hiding under.

(via rhamphotheca)


paleopedia:

The Shoshone mountain lizard, Shonisaurus (1976)
Phylum : ChordataClass : ReptiliaOrder : IchthyosauriaInfraorder : ShastasauriaFamily : ShastasauridaeGenus : ShonisaurusSpecies : S. popularis
Late Triassic (228 - 208,5 Ma)
15 m long and 30 000 kg (size)
Oceans worldwide (map)
Fossils of Shonisaurus were first found in a large deposit in Nevada in 1920. Thirty years later, they were excavated, uncovering the remains of 37 very large ichthyosaurs. These were named Shonisaurus, which means “Lizard from the Shoshone Mountains”, after the formation where the fossils were found.
Shonisaurus had a long snout, and its flippers were much longer and narrower than in other ichthyosaurs. While Shonisaurus was initially reported to have had socketed teeth (rather than teeth set in a groove as in more advanced forms), these were present only at the jaw tips, and only in the very smallest, juvenile specimens. All of these features suggest that Shonisaurus may be a relatively specialised offshoot of the main ichthyosaur evolutionary line…
(read more)

paleopedia:

The Shoshone mountain lizard, Shonisaurus (1976)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Reptilia
Order : Ichthyosauria
Infraorder : Shastasauria
Family : Shastasauridae
Genus : Shonisaurus
Species : S. popularis

  • Late Triassic (228 - 208,5 Ma)
  • 15 m long and 30 000 kg (size)
  • Oceans worldwide (map)

Fossils of Shonisaurus were first found in a large deposit in Nevada in 1920. Thirty years later, they were excavated, uncovering the remains of 37 very large ichthyosaurs. These were named Shonisaurus, which means “Lizard from the Shoshone Mountains”, after the formation where the fossils were found.

Shonisaurus had a long snout, and its flippers were much longer and narrower than in other ichthyosaurs. While Shonisaurus was initially reported to have had socketed teeth (rather than teeth set in a groove as in more advanced forms), these were present only at the jaw tips, and only in the very smallest, juvenile specimens. All of these features suggest that Shonisaurus may be a relatively specialised offshoot of the main ichthyosaur evolutionary line…

(read more)

(via rhamphotheca)


rhamphotheca:

america-wakiewakie: Prison Industrial Complex

rhamphotheca:

america-wakiewakie: Prison Industrial Complex


paleopedia:

The short Stranger, Xenobrachyops (1972)
Phylum : ChordataClass : AmphibiaOrder : TemnospondyliFamily : BrachyopidaeGenus : XenobrachyopsSpecies : X. allos
Early Triassic (252,3 - 251,3 Ma)
50 cm long (size)
Australia (map)
Xenobrachyops is an extinct genus of amphibian from the Triassic.

paleopedia:

The short Stranger, Xenobrachyops (1972)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Amphibia
Order : Temnospondyli
Family : Brachyopidae
Genus : Xenobrachyops
Species : X. allos

  • Early Triassic (252,3 - 251,3 Ma)
  • 50 cm long (size)
  • Australia (map)

Xenobrachyops is an extinct genus of amphibian from the Triassic.

(via rhamphotheca)


astronomy-to-zoology:

Island Thrush (Turdus poliocephalus)

…a species of thrush that occurs from Taiwan, through Southeast Asia ranging from Melanesia to Samoa. Like other thrushes T. poliocephalus forages mostly in leaf litter and in low branches, and its diet consists mostly of small invertebrates, small vertebrates and fruits and seeds. T. poliocephalus has a large (49) number of subspecies most of which vary dramatically in appearance and range.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Passeriformes-Turdidae-Turdus-T. poliocephalus

Images: Neon Tomas Buenaflor Rosell II and Hiyashi Haka

(via rhamphotheca)




rhamphotheca:

The migrant hawker, Aeshna mixta, is found throughout central and southern Europe, north Africa, the Middle East and across Asia to China and Japan. As it is a migratory species it can occur outside its normal range and in recent years it has been spreading northwards. Aeshna mixta reproduces mainly in standing, largely unshaded waters, but is also found at slowly flowing streams and rivers. It occurs in a wide range of waters, and larvae even develop in brackish habitats. More about this species: Encyclopedia of LifeImage by Karsten via Flickr 

rhamphotheca:

The migrant hawker, Aeshna mixta, is found throughout central and southern Europe, north Africa, the Middle East and across Asia to China and Japan. As it is a migratory species it can occur outside its normal range and in recent years it has been spreading northwards.

Aeshna mixta reproduces mainly in standing, largely unshaded waters, but is also found at slowly flowing streams and rivers. It occurs in a wide range of waters, and larvae even develop in brackish habitats.

More about this species: Encyclopedia of Life

Image by Karsten via Flickr 


rhamphotheca:

A young and endangered Florida Panther, a subspecies of cougar/puma/mountian lion, strolls down the board walk during a quiet afternoon at Aurdubon’s Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary outside of Naples, FL.
(via: Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary)

rhamphotheca:

A young and endangered Florida Panther, a subspecies of cougar/puma/mountian lion, strolls down the board walk during a quiet afternoon at Aurdubon’s Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary outside of Naples, FL.

(via: Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary)